What is a Community of Practice? (CoP)

Communities of Practice (CoPs) are groups of people who share an interest or a passion for something they do, and a desire to share knowledge and learn as they interact regularly. Three characteristics are crucial:

  • The domain: A community of practice has an identity defined by a shared domain of interest. Membership therefore implies a commitment to the domain, and therefore a shared competence that distinguishes members.
  • The community: In pursuing their interest in their domain, members engage in joint activities and discussions, help each other, and share information. They build relationships that enable them to learn from each other.
  • The practice: Members of a community of practice are practitioners. They develop a shared repertoire of resources: experiences, stories, tools, ways of addressing recurring problems—in short a shared practice. This takes time and sustained interaction.

It is the combination of these three elements that constitutes a community of practice. And it is by developing these three elements in parallel that one cultivates such a community.  Communities develop their practice through a variety of activities including: problem solving; requests for information; seeking experience; reusing assets; coordination and synergy; discussing developments; documentation; site visits; creation of materials and resources  and mapping knowledge and identifying gaps.

How Communities of Practice Make a Difference

The benefits of this type of mutuality and co-participation include:

  • More perspective and understanding of the problems and issues = Improved solutions
  • Shared Practice = Less duplication and reduced cost and time
  • Shared Knowledge = Stronger workforce and more sources of expertise
  • Meaningful participation = Improved performance and outcomes
  • Increased trust and confidence = Increased success and sustainability

To find out more information please contact:

Julie Darnay, Manager, Partnerships & Communities of Practice
Hospice Palliative Care Ontario
jdarnay@hpco.ca
T: 416.304.1477 ext. 30 or 1.800.349.3111 ext. 30

 

Compassionate Communities Community of Practice (CC CoP)

The conceptual model for our provincial level Compassionate Communities CoP is a combination of population health promotion (PHAC, 2012); the Ottawa Charter (WHO, 1986); the Chronic Disease Management Model (Group Health Research Institute 2003), and Accountable Communities for Health (Cantor 2015)

Purpose

The purpose for this Community of Practice is to connect individuals in Ontario that are actively involved in a structured Compassionate Community project and offer an infrastructure to support these individuals in sharing knowledge and information.

Goals of the CoP

  • To facilitate a forum for dialogue and exchange of information
  • To share outcomes for comparable learning
  • To grow leadership skills and capacity
  • To provide opportunities to support individuals within the field
  • To foster collaboration and innovation (i.e., technology; population-level risk screening)
  • To create synergy and identify common projects
  • To enhance capacity
  • To cultivate best practices
  • To develop as an active and engaged community of practice advancing the goals.

To become a member of the Compassionate Communities of Ontario Community of Practice, please click here.

Hospice palliative care is aimed at relieving suffering and improving the quality of life for persons
who are living with, or dying from, advanced illness or are bereaved. The goal is to provide comfort
and dignity for the person living with the illness and his or her family as well as the best quality of
life. The wholistic domains of issues often associated with illness and bereavement include: disease
management, physical, psychological, social, spiritual, practical, end-of-life care and death
management, as well as loss and grief. Therefore, hospice palliative care is not just about dying, it is
about living well to the natural end of life.

In light of Canada’s rapidly aging population, Hospice Palliative Care Ontario is supporting a new
provincial strategy called “Compassionate Communities” to catalyze whole person care throughout
the province of Ontario, to benefit patients, family caregivers, and the formal health care system.
Consistent with Ontario’s Patients First agenda, this enhances access to care and strengthens
Ontario’s ability to connect, inform, and protect seniors as well as people with chronic and advanced
disease and their caregivers.

Read more

 

Rural Hospice Palliative Care Community of Practice (RHPC CoP)

Definition of Rural

Several definitions and considerations related to ‘rural’ and ‘rural health’ exist, however no standard definition exists. Therefore, for the purpose of the Rural HPC CoP, the definition for ‘rural’ to guide ongoing discussions addressing issues in rural communities was adopted from the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care:

‘Rural’ communities in Ontario are those with a population of less than 30,000 that are greater than 30 minutes away in travel time from a community with a population of more than 30,000.

Background

Why is a Rural Hospice Palliative Care Community of Practice needed?   It is known that rural Ontario has a higher proportion of seniors per capita as compared to urban settings and the projections are signalling that this trend will be increasing in the coming years.

Intent

HPCO is dedicated to hosting and supporting the Rural Hospice Palliative Care Community of Practice and continuing to facilitate and share work that encourages rural HPC discussions, reinforces the connections, and participates in the shared dialogue and opportunities of CoP collaboration.

Goals

  • To facilitate a forum for dialogue and exchange of information
  • To provide opportunities to support individuals within the field
  • To foster collaboration and innovation (i.e., technology)
  • To create synergy and identify common projects
  • To enhance capacity

To become a member of the Rural Hospice Palliative Care Community of Practice, please click here.

 

Health Care Consent Advance Care Planning Community of Practice (HCC ACP CoP)

Background

The Health Care Consent Advance Care Planning Community of Practice (HCC ACP CoP) was created to respond to the need for a provincial resource for Health Care Consent and Advance Care Planning practice utilizing an Ontario legal framework. Both national and provincial initiatives related to Advance Care Planning have contributed to help drive the work and activities by this group.  Goals are reflective of an Ontario legal framework and reinforce the link between HCC & ACP to the public and health care providers.

A key link to the HCC ACP CoP is Speak-Up Ontario, which is a partnership between HPCO and the Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association (CHPCA) which began in February 2012.  This is the Ontario version of the National Speak-Up Campaign, which provides education and Ontario based tools and resources across the province.

This Community of Practice has been in existence since 2010 in various forms.  The Alzheimer Knowledge Exchange initially supported it until the spring of 2013.  It continued its work after the funding from Seniors Health Research Transfer Network (SHRTN) ended, and later officially transitioned to Hospice Palliative Care Ontario (HPCO) where it has been principally led by a dedicated group of HCC ACP expert leaders.

Structure

The HPCO HCC ACP CoP is responsive to its membership and has evolved to meet the growing interest and demand for leadership and resources throughout Ontario. As such the current structure includes:

Leadership Advisory Team
• Appointed by HPCO, as recommended by the members of the Leadership Advisory Team, or others as appropriate, to advise HPCO and the HCC ACP CoP on opportunities, issues and solutions, as well as recommended Ontario tools, resources, promotion, awareness, etc. The Leadership Team also leads material reviews.
• The Leadership Advisory Team consists of between 10 – 12 members
• The Leadership Advisory Team are volunteer members that are committed to advancing awareness, knowledge and skills related to HCC ACP in Ontario and is comprised of a diverse group of experts in the legal, policy, clinical, operational, knowledge translation and implementation domains of HCC ACP.
• Meets a minimum of 10 times a year with additional meetings as required.
• HPCO and Leadership Team to review membership annually to:
• Assess current members’ level of engagement and participation and make suggestions for membership team adjustments as needed.
• Ensure current membership reflects and aligns with the current CoP’s priorities, activities and evolvement.
• Ensure that members are not in a conflict of interest.

Champions Group
• Appointed by HPCO, as recommended by the members of the Leadership Advisory Team, or others as appropriate, as recognized champions in HCC ACP in Ontario.
Regional Champions – a minimum of two representatives from each LHIN area who have a lead role for promoting and implementing HCC ACP within their geography, ideally at a regional level.
• Required to successfully complete a 3-month orientation and mentorship training.
• Meets a minimum of quarterly to provide a forum for information exchange, knowledge transfer and share information about HCC ACP initiatives within the Ontario framework; and to promote the recommended Ontario tools and resources and build awareness.
• Members must be vigilant and exemplary in sharing resources, to ensure consistency with Ontario legal framework.
• HPCO and Leadership Team to review Regional Champion membership annually to:
• Assess current members’ level of engagement and participation and make suggestions for membership team adjustments as needed.
• Ensure current membership reflects and aligns with the current CoP’s priorities, activities and evolvement.
• Ensure that members are not in a conflict of interest.
To register, click here.

Organizational (or Sector) Champions – from across organizations (e.g., hospitals, LTC, community, social services, etc.,) that have a lead role for promoting and implementing HCC ACP within their organization, sector or community.
• Required to successfully complete the HPCO on-line HCC ACP learning program.
• Meet a minimum of quarterly to provide a forum for information exchange, knowledge transfer and share information about HCC ACP initiatives within the Ontario framework; and to promote the recommended Ontario tools and resources and build awareness.
• Members must be vigilant and exemplary in sharing resources, to ensure consistency with Ontario legal framework.
• Endorsed by their organization to take this lead role for promoting HCC ACP education and to facilitate knowledge translation within the organization or community.

To register click here.

 

Community Research Collaborative Community of Practice (CRC CoP)

Humans are social beings and have evolved to live in families, groups, and communities. “Community” is the crucible for most important determinants of health, as well as for many of the important social relationships that make life worth living. Hospice Palliative Care Ontario (HPCO) and the hospice palliative care sector have endorsed the “Compassionate Community” as a way to mobilize whole communities to promote holistic care across the life span, including end of life. Other community efforts have complimentary aims that could also benefit people with life-altering conditions and their caregivers. As researchers, academics, analysts, and community leaders from diverse backgrounds, we each recognize the role that communities play in the health of individuals and families.

This CoP is a voluntary collaboration of like-minded researchers who are working together to explore and test a new theoretical paradigm that emphasizes the ecological, nested, and interactive relationship between health, social and economic environment of communities, along with integrated theories of community health change, in order to guide the development of multilevel program models and embedded measurement of public value and population-level impact. Research, evaluation and knowledge translation are important tools in shaping community development, action, and impact. Adopting a learning system approach to integrate research and evaluation methods in tandem with program development and delivery can help ensure the scalability and sustainability of new and existing Community initiatives.

Purpose

The purpose of this CoP is to stimulate and mobilize research and to develop evidence that is critical for informed decision making and community action.  To do this, the CoP will:

  • Connect like-minded researchers and offer an infrastructure to support these individuals in sharing knowledge and information.
  • Develop and share novel, pragmatic and agile research and evaluation approaches for adoption by existing and emerging implementation communities

This work is intended to impact population level health and quality of life, and influence actions that:

  1. Build healthy public policy.
  2. Create supportive environments.
  3. Strengthen community action.
  4. Develop personal skills.
  5. Re-orientate health care services toward prevention of illness and promotion of health. (World Health Organization, The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion)

To find out more information, please contact Julie Darnay, Manager of Partnerships & Communities of Practice – jdarnay@hpco.ca